Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us? - Pangaea Sculptors' Centre

By admin, December 21, 2020

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Digital render for Portland stone shelter: Michael Gregory for PSC, courtesy of the artist.


PROJECTS

Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?

Pangaea Sculptors’ Centre is delighted to present ‘Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’, a new sculptural installation by artist Lucy Tomlins.

By definition, a camp is a place of temporary residence – built of huts, tents, or other structural forms, typically used by soldiers, refugees, or travellers. For this installation, Tomlins will present a series of shelters made from mycelium, Portland stone and cob, offering an innovative way to bring together concerns around sustainable development through the material explorations and platform of contemporary sculpture.

Developed for initial installation for Coventry City of Culture 2021, before touring, ‘Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’ will present an ambitious new body of work that seeks to investigate how artists might use materials to underscore the key questions of sustainability in contemporary society.  The title of this project derives from Mario Merz’s,Igloo, Do We Go Around Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’, (1977, reconstructed 1985), with this reference acting as a departure point from which to build significant dialogues around sculpture and its material agency. Drawing on three different technical approaches, this installation will combine sculptural and architectural elements, bringing together traditional practices and cutting edge techniques to examine sculpture as a space of possibility and transformation. 

Pangaea Sculptors’ Centre and the artist recognise and highlight that it isn’t just one artist that makes these projects happen. This work is produced by artist Lucy Tomlins in collaboration with a skilled team of practitioners and specialists, including Mike Gregory & Luke Twigger (PSC), Oksana Bondar & Candyce Dryburgh (Biohm), and stonemason Adeline Wartner.

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‘Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’ will be developing over the coming months, you can follow the practical progress of the project here.

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EVENTS

This installation will be used as a focal point for discussions around the future of the built environment, its impact on the way we live and on the formation of community and culture. We will be hosting a series of talks that seek to unpack the key questions and issues raised.

Events and Talks Programme to be announced.

 

 

 

MATERIALS

Over the past few years, the notion of sustainable art has grown considerably, making a number of efforts to increase the awareness of key issues regarding the social and environmental impact. Contemporary Sculpture is quickly becoming a part of these efforts, with ‘Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’ returns us to a focus on material and why it matters, creating three new technically ambitious works that are made from:

 

MYCELIUM

One of the newest and most promising sustainable materials is mycelium, the thread-like underground root network of fungi, in combination with organic waste matter; an 100% organic material and a biodegradable alternative to plastic. It’s application for a structure of the size and complexity of this artwork, in a single unit, is untested and provides an opportunity for increased material understanding as well as the creation of a unique artwork.

This is only possible through the collaboration with project partner, Biohm, leading pioneers in the research of mycelium and other bio-based materials, and soon to go into production of the world’s first accredited mycelium insulation panel.

 

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Image Credits: Alicia Canter for Biohm

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MATERIALS

 

Over the past few years, the notion of sustainable art has grown considerably, making a number of efforts to increase the awareness of key issues regarding the social and environmental impact. Contemporary Sculpture is quickly becoming a part of these efforts, with ‘Camp, Do We Go Around the Houses, or Do Houses Go Around Us?’ returning us to a focus on material and why it matters, creating three new technically ambitious sculptures that are made from:

 

 

MYCELIUM

 

Mycelium is the vegetative root structure of fungus and it offers near limitless opportunities for the development of biobased materials for application in numerous industries. Mycelium biobased materials are renewable, regenerative, can be made to be either strong or flexible and are naturally hydrophobic. Its unique properties present tremendous potential for the material’s application. Experimental projects and material developments can be found across architecture, fashion and design and this material is now finding its way into the world of sculpture.

 

It’s application for a structure of the size and complexity of this artwork, in a single unit, is untested and provides an opportunity for increased material understanding as well as the creation of a unique artwork. This is only possible through the collaboration with project partner, Biohm, leading pioneers in the research, development and biomanufacturing of mycelium and other bio-based materials, and soon to release the world’s first accredited mycelium insulation panel.

 

Mycelium being grown at the Biohm research lab in Shepherds Bush, west London. Photographed 2 December 2019. Copyright holder: Alicia Canter / aecanter@gmail.com / 0044 7724238981 - contact photographer before any publication to arrange fee

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Credits: Alicia Canter for Biohm.

 

PORTLAND STONE

 

The noblest and most enduring of building materials, the second shelter will be traditionally hand carved out of reclaimed blocks of Portland stone, assembled and built to last. Digital scanning and sculpting technologies will be an essential part of the making process, bringing together the traditional with technical innovation – made possible through partnership with Building Crafts College.

 

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Credit, Photograph 3: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

 

RAW CLAY & STRAW

 

Clay and straw are plentiful natural resources used for a range of different applications across all seven continents from thatched roofs, to the delicate craftsmanship of the Kumartuli of Kolkata, to cob buildings.

 

With potential to last and also enabling impermanence, these natural materials lend themselves to both durational and temporary installation, depending on the approach to their application. Clay left unfired will break down with water and can be recycled or returned to the earth. It is with this in mind that the third shelter will be constructed. In March 2020, Tomlins undertook a research trip to Kolkata, India, to learn more about this technique, supported by Coventry City of Culture and the British Council. You can read more about this research trip via the Kumartuli Research Journal.

 

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PROJECT PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS

 

BIOHM 

 

Biohm is a multi-award-winning research and development led, bio-manufacturing company. They allow nature to lead innovation, to revolutionise construction and create a healthier, more sustainable, built-environment.

 

BUILDING CRAFTS COLLEGE 

 

Founded by the Worshipful Company of Carpenters in 1893, the Building Crafts College has a long tradition of delivering high quality education training in building crafts and building conservation.

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